Dublin Tour

Guinness Storehouse : 

Is a tourist attraction at St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening in 2000, it has received over four million visitors. The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. The ground floor introduces the beer's four ingredients (water, barley, hops and yeast), and the brewery's founder, Arthur Guinness. Other floors feature the history of Guinness advertising and include an interactive exhibit on responsible drinking. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with views of Dublin and where visitors may drink a pint of Guinness included in the price of admission. In 2006, a new wing opened incorporating a live installation of the present-day brewing process. The building in which the Storehouse is located was constructed in 1902 as a fermentation plant for the St. James's Gate Brewery (where yeast is added to the brew). The building was designed in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture and was the first multi-storey steel-framed building to be constructed in Ireland. The building was used continuously as the fermentation plant of the Brewery until its closure in 1988, when a new fermentation plant was completed near the River Liffey. In 1997, it was decided to convert the building into the Guinness Storehouse, replacing the Guinness Hop Store as the Brewery's visitor centre. The redesign of the building was undertaken by the UK-based design firm Imagination in conjunction with the Dublin-based architects firm RKD, and the Storehouse opened to the public on 2 December 2000.

 


Dublinia:   (The Viking Experience)

Take a trip back to Viking times and discover what life was like on board a Viking warship. See their weaponry and the skills of being a Viking warrior. Try on Viking clothes, become a slave and stroll down a noisy street. Trip back in time to Viking Dublin with costumes, weaponry and a Viking street. Witness the sights, sounds and smells of a busy medieval city. Discover how archaeology and history piece together our ancestors’ lives. See Viking & Medieval artefacts. Catch our panoramic views of Dublin city from the top of a medieval tower.


Malahide Castle :

The estate began in 1185, when Richard Talbot, a knight who accompanied Henry II to Ireland in 1174, was granted the "lands and harbour of Malahide". The oldest parts of the castle date back to the 12th century and it was home to the Talbot family for 791 years, from 1185 until 1976. The estate survived such losses as the Battle of the Boyne, when fourteen members of the owner's family sat down to breakfast in the Great Hall, and all were dead by evening, and the Penal Laws, even though the family remained Roman Catholic until 1774. Malahide Castle and Demesne was eventually inherited by the 7th Baron Talbot and on his death in 1973, passed to his sister, Rose. In 1975, Rose sold the castle to the Irish State, partly to fund inheritance taxes. The ornamental gardens adjoining the castle cover an area of about 22 acres and were largely created by Lord Milo Talbot. He was an enthusiastic plant collector who brought specimens from around the world to create the gardens here; he also re-landscaped the grounds here to dramatic effect. In all there are in excess of 5000 difference species and varieties of plants present. The gardens are best described as a small Botanic garden. In addition to the abundance of flora our exhibition presents fascinating stories about the gardens, Milo and Rose and the wonderful world of southern hemisphere plants. The garden interactive exhibition is located in the Visitor Centre and is the ideal place to find out more about the gardens created by Lord Milo Talbot, the last Lord Talbot to reside at Malahide Castle.

                                                       


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